The perfect house.

Grand Designs best episode by far is about Ben, the woodman.

Watch on 4OD.

Building his house from the timber in the woodland he looks after, he ensures sustainability and is almost entiely self sufficient.


Musskett and Mazzullo’s ‘woven for the home’ collection using some of the finest British cashmere and lambs wool.

I like their use of neutral shades and also the scale of pattern and repeat, through using white on white, the structures look textural and add dimension to the cloth. Also through the use of cream, white and all natural shades, there are connotations of purity and calm, which makes them perfect for the home environment. Also, they look SO comfortable and cosy!

The website guides you elegantly through their collection.

http://www.muskett-mazzullo.co.uk/


Bauhaus was founded in Germany 1919. Founded by Walter Gropious, the school of art and design was an institution that pushed the idea of respect for materials and geometric design.

Anni Albers was a key contributor to the Bahaus artists work.

“Anni approached textiles almost like a sculptor. She was of the opinion that “the thread should speak for itself, that somehow the hand of the artist, the hand of the craftsperson, the hand of the weaver wasn’t going to interfere with how the thread wanted to be seen,” says Matilda McQuaid, a Cooper-Hewitt curator. So significant were Anni’s contributions that in 1949 she became the first woman textile artist to have a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art. (www.layersofmeaning.org)

The geometric shapes and proportion of colour within Bauhaus are aesthetically exciting, especially the details within the weaves themselves as well as the paper designs. Great pictures can be found in Bauhaus Textiles: Women Artists and The Weaving Workshop. The designs, although created closer to the beginning of the last century, stimulate inspiration.

For me Bauhaus could never become dated.